A Typical Day at ICDE

Morning

Morning Class Recipe: Veal Marengo
Program: Professional Diploma in Culinary Arts (Double Diploma)
Level: Level 2 – Intermediate French cuisine
Duration: 4 hours (half-day)

Veal Marengo: Recipe’s historical background

Marengo is a small Italian village in Piemonte, where Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte won a historical battle against the Austrian army on June 14th 1800. After the battle, as Napolon was getting hungry and the camp running low on food supplies, Napoleon’s chef Dunand quickly improvised a recipe with the few food ingredients that were still available in storage. He fried a chicken in olive oil with with tomatoes and garlic, and served it with fried eggs, crayfish and bread croutons. Napoleon loved it.

Over time, Dunand modified his recipe, as chicken became veal, mushrooms replaced the crayfish, and the fried eggs gave way to glazed onions and white wine… Napoleon kept enjoying the dish, and the original “Marengo sauce” remained untouched, as a hommage to Napoleon’s victory. 

Veal Marengo – Morning Class Schedule:

8:55-09:00
Hygiene and sanitation preparation (hand-washing, uniform inspection)

09:00-09:05
Students prepare their working station and small equipment

09:05-09:15
The Master Chef instructor explains the recipe of the day, Veal Marengo, introducing the historical background for the recipe, and the relevant lexicon in French and English.

09:15-09:30
The Master Chef instructor explains the theory and practical use for the veal cutting charts, including a discussion on differences between the charts’ standards in France, the UK and the USA.

09:30-09:40
Culinary demonstration by the Master Chef-Instructor: how to trim the veal shoulder and cube it in 50 grams size.

09:40-09:55
Student practice: repeating the veal shoulder trimming, with support and supervision from the Master Chef-Instructor and assistant Chef-Instructors.

09:55-10:00
Students clean their working station.

10:00-10:15
Master Chef instructor demonstration: preparing the aromatic garnish for the Marengo “ragout” sauce (using white wine, tomato paste, flour, onions, garlic, parlsey, “bouquet garni”, brown veal stock).

10:15-10:45
Student practice: preparing the garnish under the Master Chef instructor supervision.

10:45 – 11:15
Master Chef instructor demonstration: setting the “ragout” veal Marengo to cook. 

11:15 – 11:45
Student practice: set the veal to cook, under the Master Chef instructor supervision.

11:45-12:00
Master Chef instructor demonstration: preparing the Marengo side dish (curved “Cocotte size” potatoes, turned mushrooms, brown-glazed pearl onions, round bread croutons).

12:00-12:30
Student practice: preparing the Marengo side dish.

12:30-12:40
The Master Chef instructor demonstrates and explains plating design choices (discussing potential alternatives), according to volumes, color and textures.

12:40-13:00
Students plate their own dishes, and the Master Chef instructor goes on to taste and analyze each dish together with the student, followed by comments and grading on the student’s individual notebooks.

Techniques learned/covered in the morning class session:
  • Brown veal stock
  • Make a saute in a sauce (“ragout”)
  • Knife-handling and cutting techniques: chopping, ciseling, curving, turning and cutting “Mirepoix” style
  • Veal meat trimming
  • Browning meat
  • “Singer” thickening techniques
  • Brown glazing pearl onion
  • Blanching potatoes
  • Frying potatoes with butter
  • Clarified butter
  • Crouton-making
  • Prepare a “bouquet garni”
  • Plating design

Lunch Break
Students can take an individual break, or eat their own dish in the classroom and sample each other’s dishes.

Afternoon Class Recipe

Afternoon Class Recipe: Tarte Tatin
Program: Professional Diploma in Culinary Arts (Double Diploma)
Level: Level 2 – Intermediate French cuisine
Duration: 4 hours (half-day)

Tarte Tatin: recipe’s historical background

The tarte Tatin was created accidentally at the Hotel Tatin in Lamotte-Beuvron, France, about 100 miles south of Paris, in the 1880s. The hotel was run by two sisters, Stéphanie and Caroline Tatin. As the story goes, Stéphanie Tatin started to make a traditional apple pie but left the apples cooking in butter and sugar for too long. Smelling the burning, she tried to rescue the dish by putting the pastry base on top of the pan of apples, quickly finishing the cooking by putting the whole pan in the oven. After turning out the upside down tart, she was surprised to find how much the hotel guests appreciated the dessert. The tarte became a signature dish of the Hôtel Tatin.

Several decades later, the famous French food writer Curnonsky and the Parisian restaurant Maxim’s would visit the restaurant, and contribute to giving the dish a wide recognition.

Nonetheless, the concept of the “upside down tarts” was not a new one. For instance, the famed patissier M. A. Carême already mentions glazed “gâteaux renversés” adorned with apples from Rouen or other fruit in his “Pâtissier Royal Parisien” (1841).

 

Tarte Tatin – afternoon class step-by-step schedule:

13:55-14:00
Hygiene and sanitation preparation (hand-washing, uniform inspection)

14:00-14:05
Students prepare their working station and small equipment

14:05-14:15
The Master Chef instructor explains the recipe of the day, the Tarte Tatin, introducing the historical background for the recipe, and the relevant lexicon in French and English.

14:15-14:35
Explanation of different categories and classifications for apples. Refresher of the shortcrust pastry and custard sauce recipes learned at Level 1. Students learn how to transform the custard sauce into vanilla ice cream.

14:35- 15:10
Master Chef instructor demonstration: salted butter caramel.  Followed by student practice.

15:10-16:25
Master Chef instructor explanation and demonstration: preparation of poaching liquid for the apples. Preparation of the apples and poaching. Followed by student practice.

16:25-17:05
Master Chef instructor demonstration: preparation of the dry caramel and tart mould, followed by student practice.

17:05-17:30
Master Chef instructor demonstration: assembly of the poached apples and the dough. Baking. Followed by student practice.

17:30-18:00
Baking. The Master Chef instructor and students taste the tarts together. Grading on the student’s individual notebooks.

Techniques learned/covered in the morning class session:

– Making a shortcrust pastry
– Making salted caramel butter
– Making a custard sauce
– Poaching (cooking in liquid)
– Making vanilla ice cream from a custard sauce